Category Archives: Uncategorized

AIIT launches new website and blog!

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The Ancient India and Iran Trust is very excited to be able to announce the launch of its brand new website and blog at www.indiran.org!

We have been eager for some time to redesign the website and in addition to improved access and overall design, the site also has some great new resources including a brand new Library page, with information on our Manuscript and Photographic Collections, as well as Private Papers and Archives.  You can also search our catalogue of over 30,000 books online, via Cambridge University Library’s brand new search facility iDiscover.

Take a look at What’s On or Who’s Who at the Trust on our new People page and do get in touch to let us know what you think of our new site.

You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Subscribe on the Blog page to receive all the latest news from the Trust.

The new look blog, in addition to being integrated into our main website, also includes new feature categories; Book News and Stories from the Collection. Look out soon for some additional People pages that will give you unique insights into the founding trustees and their archives at the trust!

As a result of the launch of our new website and blog, no further news or features will be added to this blog site.  If you have previously subscribed to this AIIT blog, we would ask you to please follow the link above to the new blog and re-subscribe there for all our latest news.

 

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Annual Allchin Symposium on South Asian Archaeology

Annual Allchin Symposium on South Asian Archaeology

2-3 December 2016, Cambridge
VENUE:  The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, &  The Ancient India and Iran Trust

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About the Symposium

The Annual Allchin Symposium on South Asian Archaeology was established to commemorate the work of Raymond and Bridget Allchin, and the outstanding contribution that they made to development of South Asian studies in the United Kingdom.

The United Kingdom is currently home to the largest community of scholars working on South Asia outside of South Asia itself. Yet, until recently, there has been no regular forum to meet, exchange ideas and share research. The Annual Allchin Symposium provides an opportunity to bring together UK-based scholars working in South Asian Archaeology, and also those researching South Asian History and the History of Art and Architecture, including established lecturers as well as post-doctoral researchers and PhD students. It creates a much-needed forum for the presentation and discussion of current research as well as methodological and theoretical concerns that affect research in South Asia. Discussions will strengthen existing research, foster new ideas and promote synergies between different areas, periods and subjects of study. This will be of great benefit to staff and students alike, many of whom work as isolated researchers within larger departments and institutions where the needs and questions relevant to the study of ancient South Asia do not necessarily correspond with mainstream agendas, and, at times, are overlooked. This is especially critical now that the British Academy has withdrawn its funding for South Asian Studies, and scholars of South Asia are being asked to compete for funding on an increasingly uneven playing field.

A keynote address, India’s global interconnections: looking west during the Roman period, will be presented by Dr Roberta Tomber (The British Museum), on the evening of Friday 2nd December, in the McDonald Institute Seminar Room (Downing Site Courtyard building). The main symposium will take place on Saturday 3rd December at the Ancient India and Iran Trust, Cambridge.

The cost of registration will be £15. Further details regarding registration and the venue, can be found on the Symposium website. It will be possible to register on the day, but if you wish to register beforehand, please contact Margaret Widdess, Administrator, Ancient India and Iran Trust, at info@indiran.org, or telephone 01223 356841 (Mon-Fri 9.30-13.00). All other enquiries should be addressed to the organisers at archaeologysouthasia@gmail.com.

Cameron Petrie, University of Cambridge
Jason Hawkes, The British Museum
Margaret Widdess, Ancient India and Iran Trust


Organised in association with:screen-shot-2016-09-19-at-19-26-57

 

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AIIT: Michaelmas Term Lecture Programme 2016

Lectures begin at 5.30pm. Refreshments from 5pm. All welcome.

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The mango tree that walked. Photograph: Dr Rukshana Nanji

  • 14 October: Special event for Friends of the Trust (Advance booking required: email info@indiran.org)
    Conor Jameson (RSPB): Save Asia’s Vultures
  • 21 October: Sudeshna Guha (Shiv Nadar University): ‘Nineveh’ in Bombay and histories of Indian Archaeology
  • 28 October: in association with the Cambridge Festival of Ideas:
    Alan Williams (University of Manchester): Migration and the Mango Tree that Walked: the Arrival of Persian Zoroastrians in Eighth-century India. Advance booking required from Cambridge Festival of Ideas.
  • 18 November: Christian Sahner (St John’s College, Cambridge): Zoroastrians and Christians under early Muslim rule
  • 2 December: Jennifer Scarce (University of Dundee): Qajar nostalgia for Sassanians

Lectures are held at

  • Ancient India & Iran Trust
    23 Brooklands Avenue
    Cambridge CB2 8BG

If you wish to attend the Friends’ event on 14th Oct., the Festival of Ideas event on 28th Oct., or would like a Friends’ application form, please contact the Administrator on info@indiran.org or tel. 01223 356841.

The Bactrian Archives… Upcoming lecture at the RAS by AIIT Chair Professor Nicholas Sims-Williams

The Bactrian archives: Reconstructing the lost history of Ancient Afghanistan

Professor Nicholas Sims-Williams (SOAS) and Chairman of the Ancient India and Iran Trust.

May 12th, 6-7pm at the Royal Asiatic Society, 14 Stephenson Way, London NW1 2HD

Anniversary General Meeting and presentation of the Denis Sinor Medal 2015

 

AIIT Cambridge: Easter Term Lecture Programme

6 MAY: Special event for Friends of the Trust
Geoff Hales: Kipling in India – a dramatised talk

20 MAY: Katherine Schofield (King’s College, London)
Music, art, and affective power between 16C North India and the Deccan

3 JUNE: AIIT Honorary Fellow Lecture 2016
Anna Dallapiccola: South Indian mural paintings (16th to 18th centuries)

Lectures begin at 5.30pm. Refreshments from 5pm. All welcome.

Ancient India & Iran Trust , 23 Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge CB2 8BG

If you wish to attend the Friends’ event on 6th May or would like a Friends’ application form, please contact the Administrator on
info@indiran.org or tel. 01223 356841

 

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Raymond Mercier: Calendars in India and a problem with eclipses in Orissa – AIIT Cambridge, 18th March, 5.30pm

REMINDER

Raymond Mercier

Calendars in India and a problem with eclipses in Orissa

Scholar and author Raymond Mercier will explain something of the variety of calendars used in mediaeval India. Each calendar counts years from a certain epoch, and while most epoch years have been established there has remained one, that of the Ganga Era of Orissa, that is still to be fixed…..

This talk is part of the Cambridge Science Festival. Booking advisable but we will endeavour to accommodate all.

Refreshments from 5pm.

Friday 18th March 2016, 5.30pm
Ancient India & Iran Trust
23 Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge CB2 8BG

Tel: 01223 356841. E-mail: info@indiran.org
http://www.sciencefestival.cam.ac.uk/events/calendars-india-and-problem-eclipses-orissa

Arthur Dudney – What Language Did Kiyomars Speak? Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Theories on the Origins of Persian – AIIT Cambridge, 19 February 5.30pm

REMINDER

Friday 19th February 5.30pm.

Arthur Dudney will speak on

What Language Did Kiyomars Speak? Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Theories on the Origins of Persian

Theories of linguistic origins before modern times were full of mythical people and semi-mythical societies. These could be dismissed out of hand as historical curiosities but this talk argues that pre-modern theories of where Persian came from are worth our attention because even if the conclusions are wildly at odds with our current understanding in historical linguistics, the tools used to reach them were remarkably intricate.

Dr. Arthur D. Dudney is currently Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Cambridge.

Refreshments from 5pm. All welcome.

Ancient India & Iran Trust
23 Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge CB2 8BG
Tel: +44 (0)1223 356841

REMINDER: Michelle Quay – Female Heroism in Sufi Hagiographical Texts – AIIT Cambridge – Friday 12th February 5.30pm.

REMINDER

Friday 12th February 5.30pm.

Michelle Quay will speak on

Female Heroism in Sufi Hagiographical Texts – From Sulami (d. 1021) to ‘Attar (d. ca. 1221)

Michelle Quay’s research in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Cambridge, focuses on the treatment of gender in Pre-modern Persian mystical poetry, particularly the poetry of the 12th century poet Farid al-Din ‘Attar. In this talk she presents a re-reading of premodern Persian and Arabic Sufi hagiographical texts from the 11th – 13th centuries through the lens of gender and the body.

Refreshments from 5pm. All welcome.

Ancient India & Iran Trust
23 Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge CB2 8BG
Tel: +44 (0)1223 356841

AIIT Lent Term Lectures 2016

Friday evening lectures: Lent Term 2016, Ancient India and Iran Trust, Cambridge.

Lectures begin at 5.30pm. Refreshments from 5pm. All welcome.

12 February: Michelle Quay (Cambridge)
Female Heroism in Sufi Hagiographical Texts – from Sulami (d. 1021) to ‘Attar (d. ca. 1221)

19 February: Arthur Dudney (Cambridge)
What Language Did Kiyomars Speak? Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Theories on the Origins of Persian

26 February: Special event for Friends of the Trust
T. Richard Blurton (British Museum)
Krishna in the Garden of Assam

18 March: Raymond Mercier (Cambridge)
(Part of the Cambridge Science Festival – booking required.
Booking opens on 8 February: info@indiran.org or tel.01223 356841)
Calendars in India and a problem with eclipses in Orissa

If you wish to attend the Friends’ event on 26 February or would like a Friends’ application form, please contact the Administrator on
info@indiran.org or tel. 01223 356841

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REMINDER: Bailey Lecture 2015: Amélie Kuhrt, Friday 11th December, 5.30pm at FAMES, Cambridge

REMINDER

The Harold Bailey Lecture 2015

Friday 11th December, 5.30pm at FAMES, Cambridge

Professor Amélie Kuhrt, FBAThe King Speaks: The Persians and their Empire

The Achaemenid empire was created in the space of less than thirty years and dominated, with considerable success, a region stretching from Central Asia to the Aegean for around 200 years. How did the Persian kings and ruling elite visualise their immense power? How was that vision expressed? In this talk, Amélie Kuhrt, Professor Emeritus at University College London, aims to present an outline of the Persian image of their domain, concentrating on monuments and inscriptions from the royal centres and leaving aside the stories of outsiders, such as Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Jews.

The lecture will begin promptly at 5.30pm, followed by a reception.
Admission free. Booking not required.

Venue: Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Sidgwick Avenue,Cambridge CB3 9DA

Enquiries: info@indiran.org tel. 01223 356841

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